About Us

Marsanne Petty
I enjoy writing, reading, photography, history, investigating old structures and trying not to get arrested by entering said structures. I write for Skirt and for Ehow. I can be contacted at mapetty@gmail.com.


Melody Lee
I like to garden and wow people with my artistic interpretations of how flowers should be arranged. I also write for Ehow and Garden Guides. I can be contacted at annlees@gmail.com.

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Thursday, April 15, 2010

April GBBD

I didn’t realize how hard it is to keep up with a blog. I don’t seem to have any time or energy left after gardening and doing things with my daughters and grandsons. Oh yeah, I do some house cleaning and cooking too, when I can’t get out of it.

Anyway, with being busy, having an icky virus and some family problems, I haven’t managed to actually write any blogs lately. At least not online, although I have done plenty in my head while in the garden or otherwise occupied.

But I made it for April Gardener Bloggers’ Bloom Day hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Here are some pics of blooms that have come and gone, and what is blooming now.


The wind has already blown away the dainty blooms of the Siverbell Tree (Halesia). The blooms on the Yoshino Cherry Tree are gone too - this was the first year it was full of blooms; there usually are only a dozen or so.


The pink Lorapetalum is still going strong. I have one white Lorapetalum, but the picture didn't come out very clear.


Fringetree or Old Man's Beard (Chionanthus virginicus) grows in the woods in this area. I love its spring time decorations.


I bought this native azalea several years ago in Georgia, but I lost the tag (of course), so I don't know its name.


Lousiana Irises also grow wild in the ditches here. I have them planted in several areas of the garden.


The blooms on the Hartlage Wine Sweetshrub (Calycanthus) are a gorgeous deep red color. It seems like they are blooming early this year.

I added this picture just for Dave of The Home Garden. I have had this creeping phlox for more than 20 years. I got it from my husband's grandmother, who called it "thrift". I still do sometimes.

Be sure to check back soon – I hope to have more articles posted today or tomorrow. And don’t forget to visit Carol for more April blooms from bloggers around the world.








10 comments:

  1. Those snowbells are something I definitely need to add. I really like those azaleas too! Thanks for the link around the phlox - yours looks great!

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  2. Lovely! I do believe Spring is finally here!

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  3. I've been having a hard time keeping up with blogging recently too. And like you I have several blog posts in my head, and also many pics to help them out in my camera. Happy bloom day. I really like the native azalea and iris. I like the pink lorapetalums for their foliage, but have to say I don't like the pink blossoms. The white don't bother me, but I don't like their foliage. Maybe I should make my own hybrid.

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  4. I really love that Old Man's Beard and Sweetshrub- both are new to me!

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  5. Great blooms! I love the fringe tree. Our neighbor had one that I used to admire. They didn't like it, I guess, because they cut it down a few years ago. I miss it. My Sweet Shrub has buds. It will be heavenly fragrant in another week. All our trees and shrubs are blooming early this year.

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  6. I am drooling...Halesia, Loropetalum, Azaleas, Chionanthus and Calycanthus!!! Beautiful!

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  7. I've never seen a yellow azalea before! How pretty! And I love the drift of phlox... a drift of "thrift", I guess you'd call it :)

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  8. You have a few plants that are new to me. Your phlox is huge! It must really like your garden to have lived so long and still look so good.

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  9. Hi Melody and thanks for visiting my blog this week. So lovely to see so many flowers. How lucky you are to get irises growing in the wild. I have some in my border, I am hoping they will flower this year as some years they seem to do nothing and others they are wonderful.

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  10. Some really beautiful specimens! I've been thinking about getting a lorapetalum for years for the foliage without realizing how pretty the flowers can be. And the Old Man's Beard might be my favorite (such a great name).

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